Education

Case of the Month

AprilCIP

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Authors: C. Eric Gullbrand, DO PGY-1, Radiology Resident, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE; Kristina A. Siddall, MD Associate Program Director, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE

Why did you select this case for submission?

Tubular adenomas are rare benign breast neoplasms with an overall incidence ranging from 0.13-1.17% of benign breast lesions. Dr. Siddall and I chose to submit this case as a review of the classic sonographic findings for tubular adenomas.

What should readers learn from this case?

Sonographic evaluation most commonly reveals a well-circumscribed, hypoechoic mass. This is usually effective in confirming the benign nature of the lesion.

What did you learn from working on the case?

Histopathological evaluation of tubular adenomas is currently the gold standard for diagnosis. Clinical, radiologic, and cytological preoperative diagnosis can be unreliable.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

Dr. Siddall pointed me in the right direction in order to obtain additional information about differential considerations and imaging findings. At Christiana, senior staff members expose residents to many unusual cases and provide helpful teaching points.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

Case in Point is a fantastic resource for providing concise information about a variety of interesting cases. As this was a relatively rare case that had not been previously described in the CIP archives, we felt this might be a compelling submission.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

I review CIP cases regularly in order to learn about interesting cases and to test my current knowledge base. The musculoskeletal cases are usually my favorite.

Is there anything else you’d like readers to know about your case?

Tubular adenomas most commonly affect young women of reproductive age and present as firm, mobile, painless breast masses. Sonographic findings can be very helpful in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions.

 

June Case of the Month

 

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Authors: Tristan Lawson, BS, MS-III, Medical Student,University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, Greenville, SC;  Jeffrey R. Wienke, MD Radiologist, Director of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Greenville Health System, Greenville, SC

Why did you select this case for submission?

I thought it would be great for Case in Point because of the uncommon pathology and the differential diagnosis. The case was a great learning opportunity to research more about a rare disease. The imaging findings provided interesting differential diagnoses such as parasitic infection and autoimmune disease.

What should readers learn from this case?

Hopefully this case provides readers with a useful synopsis of the clinical presentation of juvenile dermatomyositis, key imaging and pathological features, potential differential diagnoses, and treatment. One particular point that is important to emphasize is that juvenile dermatomyositis can be misdiagnosed as an allergic reaction due to periorbital edema and rash.

What did you learn from working on the case?

I learned a great deal working on this case. I wrote this case as a medical student. The process of reviewing the imaging really reinforced the limitations and advantages of different imaging modalities and MRI sequences. I also was unaware that JDM is thought to be a combination of genetic predispositions and environmental triggers. I enjoyed working on a radiologic case, and creating a CIP case piqued my interest in radiology as a specialty choice.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

Dr. Jeff Wienke, the director for MSK imaging at Greenville Health System, provided me with exceptional guidance. I reviewed the imaging findings with him and talked through different aspects of the case. Drs. John Gilpin and Sylvester Lee were also helpful radiology mentors at Greenville Health System.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

I think CIP provides a great format for learning and sharing interesting cases. The layout of the cases combined with the questions reinforces key concepts. And the cases are fun to work through!

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

I used Case in Point frequently as a medical student. My favorite cases were the ones that presented several different imaging modalities so I could see the pathology through different lenses. I also enjoy cases that discuss clinical presentation and treatment.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with readers about this case?

I wrote this case while I was third-year medical student. Case in Point was a great learning opportunity and furthered my interest in radiology. I am currently a preliminary medicine intern at Greenville Health System and will be starting my Diagnostic Radiology residency at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center next year. I am excited to begin my formal radiology training and become a part of this fascinating profession.

 

May Case of the Month

May CIP

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Authors: Michael R. Stetz, MD PGY-4, Radiology Resident, Resident, Department of RadiologyMedical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee, WI; Ross Cerniglia, MD Assistant Professor of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Department of Radiology Medical College of Wisconsin Milwaukee, WI

Why did you select this case for submission?

This case was the first time I had come across this entity or diagnosis. After seeing the MR imaging findings, comparing them to the radiographic findings, and discussing them with staff, it seemed like a worthwhile investment of time to do some additional research. While the more senior staff in the department were familiar with the diagnosis, only a few had ever seen a case first-hand. So they suggested investigating it further and submitting it as an interesting and clinically relevant case. It seemed to me that if senior staff at a relatively busy academic institution had only ever seen one or two cases, it would be worth passing it along to the radiology community.

What should readers learn from this case?

Pediatric imaging can be a challenging endeavor when a case comes across the workstation. For those of us who are not pediatric fellowship-trained, the occasional radiograph of a pediatric patient can be a tricky situation if the finding is not immediately obvious. The goal of presenting this case was to hopefully add another tool to the thought process toolbox of approaching extremity injuries that don't fit nicely into common conditions –like buckle fracture, greenstick fracture, etc. Perhaps going forward, someone reading a case of pediatric trauma, which appears normal radiographically but clinically is still having symptoms,could at least suggest this diagnosis to the clinician and take appropriate action early to improve patient care.

What did you learn from working on the case?

This definitely reinforced that pediatric imaging can be difficult! Especially as a resident, this case is quite enlightening as to the nuances of pediatric radiography and how we use advanced imaging when the answer isn't clear on the most basic imaging tool we have available. For me, realizing how subtle a finding on radiography is and comparing that to the significant consequences of the actual pathology was quite eye-opening.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

Senior staff encouraged me to do a bit of research on the topic after we read the MRI and realized what was going on. With this being my first experience with this entity – and seeing how subtle the radiographic findings can be compared to the MRI findings – and learning about the significant clinical impact a delay in diagnosis could have, they thought it would be a great case to submit.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

I find Case in Point to be an efficient and effective way to review a broad range of different topics in radiology. The cases are quick to review, well-written, and the vast majority have at least a few points that can be immediately applied to daily practice. I find this type of CME to be the most beneficial. Hopefully this case fits well into that mold for those who read it.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

I enjoy doing CIP regularly. It's a quick way to test my interpretation skills across all modalities and on topics I don't read on a daily. I invariably learn something about the subject of the case through either the questions or short case discussions. Having recently completed my MSK fellowship, I'm biased towards MSK cases. But I still enjoy testing myself on topics I don't see on a regular basis.

Is there anything else you’d like readers to know about your case?

The patient in this case went on to have appropriate care and is doing well!

Case of the Year

One case stood out in a sea of 261 submissions.case in point

In medicine, a diagnosis is not always straightforward. Many diseases or conditions can present in various way, depending on the circumstances. So how do you train for the uncommon presentations?

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How Mentoring Can Benefit the Specialtymentoring benefits

Although women make up nearly half of all medical students, they represent a significantly smaller proportion of radiologists, with the 2016 ACR workforce survey revealing that only 21.4 percent of radiologists are female.

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Final Read

Raymond E. Bozman, MD, FACR
final read

It was the summer of 1978 and the rising second-year medical student was beginning an elective rotation in radiology at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.

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ACR Fellowship Round-Up

Take a look at the opportunities the ACR has to offer.fellowship opportunities

Want to know more about the College and build your resume at the same time? Apply for a fellowship.

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A Preview of ACR 2017 for Residents and FellowsACR2017

The 25th annual meeting of the ACR Resident and Fellow Section (RFS) will be held May 20–21, 2017, immediately preceding ACR 2017 (May 21-25) in Washington, D.C.

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The crème de la crème of Case in Point

Discover the Case in Point community’s favorite cases.

GenericForWeb

Each month, we sift through thousands of reviews by the Case in Point community to find the best cases. Here’s your chance to take a look at the cases that made the cut and to get to know the authors.

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Putting Together the Pieces

Radiology's role in detecting, reporting, and diagnosing potential cases of child abuse.putting together the pieces

Every 10 seconds, child abuse is reported in the U.S. More than 3.6 million cases are referred to child protection agencies every year, involving more than 6.6 million children.

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Spreading the Word about Global Radiology by Starting a Dedicated JournalSpreading word about global radiology

Helping others abroad is a large and immensely important part of global radiology. I would like to take a moment to highlight a few other parts that I have had the opportunity to watch blossom. These too add to the infrastructure of this essential movement.

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Simulation Transformation

Are you ready to aid a patient experiencing acute contrast medium reaction?

chair 11 14

When I began my career, use of ionic contrast medium seemed to prompt several contrast reactions each day.

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Meet the ACR Leadership: Bruce Hillman, MD, FACR

This is an installment of a series titled “Meet the ACR Leadership.” Throughout the series, we interview the ACR Leadership to get insight into their background and involvement in the ACR.meet acr leadership

For this installment, Anthony Trace, MD, PhD, resident at Eastern Virginia Medical School, interviews Dr. Bruce Hillman, MD, who is the Founding Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the American College of Radiology, Professor and Former Chair of Radiology at the University of Virginia.

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JACRⓇ September 2016 HighlightsJACRBlog

The September Issue of the JACRⓇ covers sharing cases on social media, bundled payments, state legislative fellowships, and the “unknown” in radiology education, among other things. Here are a handful of articles of special interest to radiologists in training.

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JACRⓇ August 2016 Highlightsaugust cover jacr

The August Issue of JACRⓇ covers the use of generic follow up recommendations, the “fellowship arms race,” after-hour overreads, and variations in teaching strategies, among other things. Here are a handful of articles of special interest to radiologists in training.

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Evidence Mattersevidence matters

Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute staff participated in AcademyHealth’s 2016 Annual Research Meeting (ARM), which took place in Boston, Mass., on June 26-28.

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JACR July 2016 HighlightsJACRBlog

The July Issue of JACRⓇ covers the misuse of the term “stable,” depression in radiologists, reporting of incidental findings, categorical radiology residency programs, and 3D printing among other things.

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Developing A Resident Health Care Economics Curriculum: Perspectives and Adviceaugust rfs economics curriculum

In the day-to-day crunch to gain clinical knowledge as a trainee, it’s tempting to put off learning the economic fundamentals. After all, health care economics isn’t tested on the Core exam and nobody will ask about it when you’re on call.

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The Power of Navigation

powernavigation

The Harvey L. Neiman Molecular Imaging Fund honors the legacy of a medical visionary who dedicated his professional life to improving patient care

 

During his tenure at the helm of the ACR, Harvey L. Neiman, MD, FACR, guided the College to become one of the world’s largest and most influential medical specialty societies.

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JACR June 2016 Highlights

JACRBlog

The June Issue of the JACR® covers the misuse of the term “intact,” knowledge and ordering habits of clinical residents, a radiology resident consultant service, a rebuttal to radiology commoditization and more. Here are a handful of articles of special interest to radiologists in training.

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The Groundbreakers

Advances in science and technology by the American College of Radiology Imaging Network are driving the practice of radiology into the future.the groundbreakers

"If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.” It’s been nearly 350 years since Isaac Newton penned that thought in a letter about making new discoveries by building on those of previous researchers.

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September Is Radiology Expo Month

How can you educate medical students about radiology?RadExpo

In 2015, the radiology match results brought great anxiety to our profession, with 33 percent of diagnostic radiology residency programs going unfilled.

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Catching Up With the ABR

As the new Core Exam enters its fourth year, here’s what you should know about the changing world of board certification.

ABRExam

In 2013, the American Board of Radiology (ABR) introduced a new process for board certification that included two written examinations — the Core Exam and the Certifying Exam. These new tests replaced the previous model, which relied on two written exams and one oral exam.

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ABR Update: Evolving MOC

ACR2016ABRUpdate

Milton J. Guiberteau, MD, FACR, president of the American Board of Radiology (ABR), delivered updates to Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Part 3: Assessment of Knowledge, Judgement, and Skills and Part 4: Improvement in Medical Practice. The ABR’s goal, he said, is to make MOC a more coherent, continuous, and convenient process.

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ePoster Gold Merit Award Recipients

Awarding the Best of the Best

trophy

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Resident’s Preview of ACR 2016

Get a peek at special meeting content for residents and fellows

RFSMeeting

The 24th annual meeting of the ACR Residents and Fellows Section (RFS) will be held May 14–15, 2016, in conjunction with ACR 2016 annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Registration for the RFS meeting is free for all residents and fellows.

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March JACR® Highlights

What should I read this month?

JACRBlog

The March 2016 issue of the JACR® covers big data, structured reporting for physicists, and more. Here are a handful of articles of special interest to radiologists in training.

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#SoMe

Potential impact of social media on global radiology education

RFS 3 8

Social media is a fascinating virtual world where people meet, interact, and share their thoughts. According to most recent estimates, Facebook had 1.44 billion monthly active users and Twitter had 320 million. And it just keeps on growing.

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October Case of the Month

 

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Authors: Matthew Locke Kendrick, MD, PGY-4/R3, Radiology Resident, Diagnostic Radiology,Department of Radiology, and Jeffrey Brandon, MD, FACR, Professor of Radiology, Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology

Institution: University of South Alabama Health System, Mobile, Ala.

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November Case of the Month

 

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Authors: Mohammed Hoque, MD, R1, Resident, Department of Radiology, Jay Shah, MD, R2, Resident, Department of Radiology, Eric F. Greif, DO, R2, Resident, Department of Radiology, Samah Jan, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medical Imaging, Body Imaging, Department of Radiology

Institution: Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, N.Y.

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December Case of the Month

 

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Authors: Joshua F. Smith, MD, PGY-3, Resident, Radiology, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, and Luke Lancaster, MD, Associate Professor, Nuclear Medicine and Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging

Institution: University of Virginia

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January Case of the Month

 

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Authors: James H. Wang, MD, PGY-1, Radiology Resident, Diagnostic Radiology, University of South Florida Health System, Tampa, Fla., Daniel Amirhamzeh, MD, PGY-4, Radiology Resident, Diagnostic Radiology, Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, Calif., and Bernard Chow, MD, Section Chief, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

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February Case of the Month

 

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Authors: Kelly G. Ford, MD, PGY-3, Radiology Resident, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn., George A. Mayhall, MD, PGY-5, Radiology Resident, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn., and Benjamin W. Wilkerson, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiology, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tenn. 

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March Case of the Month

1

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Authors: Jay Karajgikar, MD, PGY-4, Radiology Resident, Diagnostic Radiology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, N.Y., John O'Donnell, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiology, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, N.Y., Ralph Milillo, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiology, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Hempstead, N.Y. 

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April Case of the Month

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Authors: Amanda Jeanne Beer, MD,PGY-5, Resident, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, and Luke Lancaster, MD, Associate Professor, Nuclear Medicine and Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA

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May Case of the Month

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Authors: John Daniel Bisges, MD, PGY-5, Radiology Resident, Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, Melanie Christine Dahse, MD, PGY-5, Radiology Resident, Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, and Anson Thaggard, MD,Associate Professor of Radiology, Nuclear Radiology,Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS

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June Case of the Month

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Authors: Tony Alias, BS, Medical Student, Texas A&M School of Medicine, College Station, TX, Jessica A. Page, MD, PGY2, Radiology Resident, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Texas A&M Health Sciences Center/Baylor Scott & White Health, Dallas, TX, and Richard E. Seggerman, MD, Body Imaging Division, Texas A&M Health Sciences Center/Baylor Scott & White Health, Dallas, TX

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July Case of the Month

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Authors: Scott Sosin, DO, Radiology Resident, Department of Radiology, Atlantic Health System-Overlook Medical Center, Summit, NJ; Marci Handler, MD, PGY3, Radiology Resident, Department of Radiology, Atlantic Health System- Overlook Medical Center, Summit, NJ; Rita Yeretsian, MD, Attending Physician, Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Atlantic Health System-Overlook Medical Center, Summit, NJ

Why did you select this case for submission?

I have a particular interest in anatomic variants and their relative benignity and/or pathologic correlates. This case is one of many such examples that I have had the privilege of seeing at my institution.

What should readers learn from this case?

Vascular anatomic variants have significant implications with regard to physiology and flow dynamics, which can lead to aneurysm formation.

What did you learn from working on the case?

Recognizing a typically “benign” anatomic entity often is not enough. Rather, its identification should prompt closer inspection for any well-documented associated pathology.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

I am fortunate to have terrific mentors at my institution (Atlantic Health System), who are always willing to teach and explain the details of our most interesting cases. Their enthusiasm is contagious!

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

Case in Point is the most respected radiology case repository on the Internet. I felt this case deserved the kind of exposure within our profession that only Case in Point could provide.

What is the appeal of online learning tools such as Case in Point as opposed to print learning venues?

Online learning is just so accessible, and so easy to squeeze into an otherwise busy day of clinical or administrative duties. Print materials could never provide the level of casual convenience that electronic CME offers.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

Yes, I try to keep up with Case in Point on a weekly basis, at the very least. I find it is an excellent resource for keeping skills sharp, and reinforcing what I have learned from textbook readings. There is nothing quite like seeing a “real world” example.

Is there anything else you'd like readers to know about your case?

You never know what you might find in your stack of studies! I am learning to always keep my eyes peeled. Expect the unexpected.

August Case of the Month

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Authors: Allison M. Aripoli, MD,PGY-4, Radiology Resident, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kans.; Lucas Meek, MDPGY-5, Assistant Professor of Radiology, Cardiothoracic Imaging, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Kansas Medical Center,Kansas City, Kans.; Steven Lemons, MD Associate Professor of Radiology,Assistant Professor of Radiology, Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Interventional Radiology University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kans.

Why did you select this case for submission?

Mycotic pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms are uncommon, but an important entity to recognize because of the associated morbidity and mortality. This case was unique not only for its rarity, but also because we were able to follow the case from presentation through treatment.

What should readers learn from this case?

The clinical context for image interpretation of cavitary lung lesions is valuable. While cavitary pulmonary metastases, granulomatosis with polyangitis, and infection can cause cavitary lesions, in the setting of sepsis, septic pulmonary emboli should be considered. It is important to realize that pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms can be caused by erosion of the vascular wall by neoplasms or infection.

What did you learn from working on the case?

This case gave me the opportunity to review causes of both cavitary lung lesions and pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms. Because mycotic pulmonary artery aneurysms are uncommon, it was also a great opportunity to review existing literature regarding treatment options.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

Senior staff interpreted this case independently, but shared the imaging findings to promote learning. I took the opportunity to review the imaging, clinical history, and available literature. When unique cases are encountered, imparting knowledge to trainees is invaluable.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

Case in Point is an excellent avenue to distribute cases amongst fellow radiology residents and radiologists. I have enjoyed many case learning opportunities through CIP, and wanted to share this rather uncommon case.

What is the appeal of online learning tools such as Case in Point as opposed to print learning venues?

Online learning in a case-based format with selected pertinent images is appealing for several reasons. First, accessing the cases is easy, especially when linked through email notification. Second, the question-type format highlighting differential diagnoses followed by a summary provides concise and directed learning. In addition, there is variety to daily cases, which is especially important for radiology trainees.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

Yes, and as a regular reader my favorite types of cases are the rare but important ones. CIP offers outstanding exposure to images of unusual cases encountered at various institutions. I also like the collection of uncommon presentations of common entities.

Is there anything else you'd like readers to know about your case?

The patient highlighted in this case had a very good clinical outcome following endovascular intervention, which is remarkable considering the reported mortality rate for patients with pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm.

September Case of the Month

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Authors: Jessica Lien, BS, MS-IV, Medical Student, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wis.; Gregory Avey, MD , Professor of Ophthalmology, Oculofacial Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wis.; Mark Lucarelli, MD, FACS, Professor of Ophthalmology, Oculofacial Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wis.

Why did you select this case for submission?

This case was recommended to me by my attending, Dr. Lucarelli, and I thought the topic was very interesting and informative.

What should readers learn from this case?

The goal of the case is to remind the reader that an orbital pseudotumor is a diagnosis of exclusion. Other causes of orbital inflammation need to be considered to ensure the appropriate treatment.

What did you learn from working on the case?

I didn’t know much about the diagnosis of orbital pseudotumors and the other causes of orbital inflammation. I learned a lot from researching the various diagnoses to write the case.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

I couldn’t have written the case without the knowledge and teaching of Drs. Lucarelli and Avey. They spent the time with me to help me better understand the different diagnoses and imaging modalities.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

We chose Case in Point because we liked the format and online learning portion of the cases.

What is the appeal of online learning tools such as Case in Point as opposed to print learning venues?

With everything moving online, it seemed like a great place for our case. The question format and immediate feedback allows for critical thinking and makes it more likely that people will remember what they learned in the case.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

Yes, and as a regular reader my favorite types of cases are the rare but important ones. CIP offers outstanding exposure to images of unusual cases encountered at various institutions. I also like the collection of uncommon presentations of common entities.

 

October Case of the Month

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Authors: Katie Davis, DO, Resident Physician, Diagnostic Radiology,Department of Radiology,MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Oh.; Vikas Jain, MD, Assistant Professor, Assistant Program Director, Diagnostic Radiology, Neurology, Department of Radiology, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Oh.

Why did you select this case for submission?

I selected this case for submission because it emphasizes the difference between impending rupture, contained rupture, and rupture of abdominal aneurysms. Distinguishing between these entities is important for clinical care.

What should readers learn from this case?

Although there is some overlap regarding the radiographic signs of contained rupture and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms, prompt recognition of contained abdominal rupture is critical to decreasing the overall patient morbidity and mortality, as there is a benefit from preoperative assessment and urgent surgery rather than emergent surgery.

What did you learn from working on the case?

I learned about the “draping aorta” sign, which is an indicator of aortic wall insufficiency. It is defined as an irregular contour of the posterolateral wall of the aorta, which is not identifiable as distinct from adjacent structures. The posterolateral wall of the aorta will closely follow the contour of the adjacent vertebral bodies.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

The guidance from senior staff supplemented and enriched my understanding of the pathologies affecting abdominal aortic aneurysms.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

I submitted a case to Case In Point once before, so I felt very comfortable with the submission requirements and the format.

What is the appeal of online learning, like Case in Point, as opposed to other learning venues, such as print?

Gone are the days of card catalogs and heading to the library in the hopes that a radiology text will be available! Online learning is an easily accessible, time-efficient, and more cost-effective option for residents.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

 I am a regular reader of Case in Point. My favorite types of cases are those relating to women's health issues. 

What else should we know about the case that you'd like to share?

This case came across our board as an outpatient study. We were able to quickly diagnose the entity and coordinate vascular surgery referral with the primary provider. The patient underwent surgery and did well!

November Case of the Month

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Authors: Ghadir H Kassab, BMBCh, PGY-IV, Radiology Resident, FFR RCSI Residency Program, Kuwait, Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Clinical Radiology; Nayanatara Swamy, MD, Specialist Radiologist, Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Clinical Radiology; Ahmed H. El Beltagi, MD, FRCR, FFRRCSI, EDiNR, Consultant, Neuroradiology, Head and Neck Radiology, Department of Clinical Radiology, Al Sabah Hospital, Zain ENT Hospital and Kuwait Cancer Center, Kuwait City, Kuwait

Why did you select this case for submission?

I selected this case because it demonstrates the imaging appearances of a rare condition.

What should readers learn from this case?

Readers should learn an awareness of this entity, CAPNON, its different imaging appearances, and differential diagnosis considerations.

What did you learn from working on the case?

I learned to consider this rare entity in the differential diagnosis of an extra medullary spinal axis calcified lesion, and about the differentiating features of CAPNON from more common diagnoses, such as meningioma. 

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

My senior staff urged me to consider the diagnosis and plan the needed diagnostic work-up. They referred me to a number of scientific articles on the topic.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

ACR’s Case In Point has an excellent reputation.

What is the appeal of online learning tools such as Case in Point as opposed to print learning venues?

Online learning is a great privilege for radiologists during all stages of their career. It provides simple, to-the-point brain teasers, and accessible references to a wide range of complex work experiences.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

Yes I am. My favorites are the neuroradiology cases.

What else should we know about the case that you'd like to share?

A pattern recognition approach should be the first step in image readings. Secondly, the most appropriate diagnoses and differential diagnoses should be built upon the first step. Common things are common, and do apply. However, awareness of inclusion and exclusion features of different diagnostic possibilities can lead to a safer diagnosis without unnecessary intervention.

December Case of the Month

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Authors: Hollie Gallagher Zate, DO, PGY-3,Radiology Resident, Department of Diagnosis Radiology, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio.; Vikas Jain, MD, Assistant Professor of Radiology, Department of Diagnosis Radiology, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Why did you select this case for submission?

My attending and I selected this case because it beautifully depicted a rare and interesting case of isolated neurosarcoidosis, from its initial presentation to biopsy and on to treatment response.

What should readers learn from this case?

Readers hopefully learn about the multitude of ways sarcoidosis can present in the nervous system and start including it in their differential diagnosis.

What did you learn from working on the case?

I learned about the various ways neurosarcoidosis can present and how difficult it can be to test for it (unlike the simple blood test obtained in systemic sarcoidosis). Additionally, submitting this case helped me get a feel for publishing cases and presentations.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

My attending greatly impacted my education on the topic and helped with the process of submitting the case, from acquiring the images to the layout of the graphics and the difficulty level of the questions.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

People visit Case in Point every day because it only takes a short amount of time to learn a great deal of information spanning all aspects of radiology. The image quality is top-notch, and the quiz questions are a fun way to learn and take a little break from the day.

What is the appeal of online learning tools such as Case in Point as opposed to print learning venues?

The appeal of online learning is that it can be done from any place at any time and doesn't require lugging around a giant book. Furthermore, online learning reaches many more people these days than print (I could even have my family see it despite them living hours away).

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

Yes! My favorites are the neuroradiology cases.

January Case of the Month

Access case here.

Authors: Andrea L. Magee, MD, PGY2, radiology resident, and Steven M. Montner, MD, assistant professor of radiology, Thoracic Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.

Why did you select this case for submission?

Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and many radiologists often don’t encounter it. Dr. Montner and I chose to submit the PCH case to provide a refresher of the clinical and imaging findings associated with this diagnosis.

What should readers learn from this case?

Patients with PCH may present with nonspecific findings such as progressive dyspnea, fatigue, and chronic cough. Pulmonary function tests may be completely unremarkable. Critically, the management of PCH differs from the management of other causes of PAH, and the routine use of vasodilators can be fatal in patients with PCH. Radiologists are well-positioned to recognize the imaging findings and suggest PCH in the correct clinical setting.

What did you learn from working on the case?

Although imaging findings may suggest PCH, it is a microscopic diagnosis. Patients are often unable to tolerate lung biopsy, and so most cases are confirmed only at autopsy, if at all.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

Working with Dr. Montner was essential in understanding the pathophysiology of PCH and how this manifests in the imaging findings. He walked me through the findings in other PCH cases and provided additional cases with common differential considerations for PCH.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

We chose to submit this case in order to provide a digestible, but still informative, summary of PCH for radiologists who might not have seen a case recently. CIP allowed us to share our case with a large number of radiologists in varying levels of training and practice.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

Yes, I receive the daily CIP emails and make it a point to complete each case. I especially appreciate cases showing unusual etiologies or abnormal presentations of common etiologies.

What else should we know about the case that you'd like to share?

We feel that we provided high-yield facts in our case and would like to emphasize to others the importance of considering PCH in patients with PAH and appropriate imaging findings. We're glad our case was well-received!

February Case of the Month

Access case here.

Authors: Dmitriy Shnayderman, MD, PGY-2, Diagnostic Radiology Resident and Paul M. Knechtges, MD, associate professor of radiology, abdominal/body imaging, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wis.

Why did you select this case for submission?

We chose this case because it beautifully demonstrates the frequently talked about and rarely seen condition, Mirizzi syndrome.

What should readers learn from this case?

Residents hopefully will learn the differential diagnosis for the biliary obstruction. Attendings will be introduced to a Csendes cholecystobiliary fistula classification, if they haven’t been already.

What did you learn from working on the case?

As a trainee, working on this case helped me become more familiar with Mirizzi syndrome, learn the important differential diagnoses, and discover that a fistula can be associated with this condition.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

My senior staff was indispensable, helping me proofread the case, choose the perfect image slices for the submission, and assisting me with a better understanding of this diagnosis.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

I consider CiP a part of my daily morning routine for learning new and interesting cases. I’ve always wanted to be a part of it.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

Definitely, it’s how I start my day – a latte with my case of the day. I enjoy seeing rare cases and hope I will be able to recall them if I see them in the future.

March Case of the Month

Access case here.

Authors: Turner K. Fishpaw, MD, PGY1, University of North Dakota, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, N.D.; Daniel Amirhamzeh, MD, PGY-5, radiology resident, diagnostic radiology, Department of Radiology, Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, Calif.; Laura E. Traube, MD, MPH, attending radiologist, interventional and diagnostic radiology, Department of Radiology; Arthur A. Lee, MD, attending radiologist, vascular and interventional radiology, department of radiology, Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, Calif.; and Bernard Chow, MD, program director, musculoskeletal imaging, Department of Radiology, Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara, Calif.

Why did you select this case for submission?

My senior staff steered my attention to this case to illustrate that chest radiographs remain a powerful imaging modality, and to demonstrate how subtle findings and broad differential diagnoses can lead to early identification and treatment of life-threatening pathology.

What should readers learn from this case?

This case should act as a teaching aid for posterior mediastinal masses and as an example of how an aortic aneurysm may present on a chest radiograph.

What did you learn from working on the case?

As my first case submission, the process of selecting representative images and composing a report worth reading was rewarding. Beyond the requisite radiology subject matter, I learned that with enthusiasm, creativity, and willingness to see a project through to completion, even a medical student can coordinate a project that produces an award-worthy case report.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

As a visiting medical student at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, I was stunned by how supportive and enthusiastic the residents and faculty were when I informed them early in my rotation that I wanted to submit a case report. With no shortage of interesting cases, we quickly identified a case with salient teaching points and subtle, interesting radiological findings. Senior staff experience with academic publication was critical in molding and polishing our final draft.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

All steps of the submission process were streamlined and easy to interpret. I especially appreciate the case suggestion step. Preliminary case approval prior to a full case write-up and submission was crucial, as I had never submitted a case before. Early approval helped confirm that I did indeed have a case worth publishing.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

I do read Case in Point regularly. My favorite cases are those that inspire a broad differential diagnosis and effectively keep the reader thinking and second-guessing until close to the end of the case. I also prefer cases that include a variety of imaging modalities.

What else should we know about the case that you would like to share?

I owe the success of this CIP submission to the support and guidance of the incredible faculty and residents at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. My rotation with them was an intensive introduction to radiology and they continue to enrich my life as a doctor and a medical learner!

February JACR Highlights

What should I read this month?

JACRhighlightsRFS

The February 2016 issue of the JACR® covers malpractice claims, reporting adverse events, and peer review in residency. Here are a handful of articles of special interest to radiologists in training.

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 Plagiarism Decoded

Journal editors weigh in on scholarly ethics in the digital age.

 plagiarism

When it comes to scholarly publishing, imitation is not the most sincere form of flattery. In fact, it’s not flattery at all. Taking or copying someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as your own, better known as plagiarism, can have severe consequences for the perpetrators — regardless of whether or not they understand the rules.

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January JACR Highlights

What should I read this month?

JACRhighlightsRFS


The January 2016 issue of the JACR® covers current hiring practices, the best articles of 2015, the physics of CT compliance, and more. Here are a handful of articles on topics of special interested to radiologists in training.

Read more ...

December JACR Highlights

What should I read this month?

JACRhighlightsRFS

The December 2015 issue of JACR highlights nonradiologists' perspectives on health services research and policy in radiology with guest editors Richard Duszak Jr., MD, FACR, Danny Hughes, PhD, and Ruth C. Carlos, MD, FACR. Understanding the nonradiologists viewpoint is critical in the changing landscape, as patients take a more active role in their care and as more decisions are made by health care economists and administrators.

Read more ...

November JACR Highlights

What should I read this month?

JACRhighlightsRFS

November 2015

This month the journal features articles on the job situation in radiology, the ICD-10 transition, and perspectives on residency spots. Here is a list of articles in the JACR® that may be of particular interests to residents and fellows.

Read more ...

What does a USPSTF Grade Mean?

Here's the rundown

Grades

On October 5, 2015, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released a draft statement regarding colorectal cancer screening.

Read more ...

October JACR® Highlights

What should residents read this month?

MorethanSumBlog

October 2015

This month the journal features articles on acing the interview, report phraseology, and the future of precision medicine. Here is a list of articles for the JACR® that may be of particular interests to residents and fellows.

Read more ...

Peer Reviewed

How to get your articles accepted, shared, and cited in the competitive world of scholarly publishing.

PeerReview

September 2015

Researchers estimate that the number of academic peer-reviewed papers increases by around 3 percent each year. Which doesn’t sound like that much until you consider just how many papers are being published: 1.8 million in 2012.

Read more ...

What’s New in the JACR®

Check out the latest online articles.

JACRBlog

August 2015

In August, the journal features the latest workforce survey, how residents are faring in their matches, and terms you should stay away from in your radiology report.

Read more ...

What's New in the JACR®

Check out the latest online articles.

JACRBlog

July 2015

In July, the journal features empowered patients, updates on dense breast legislation, and CME opportunities.

Read more ...

Moreton Lecture: Imaging in the Era of Precision Medicine

Radiology is well-positioned as health care becomes increasingly person-based.

201505190238

May 2015

On Tuesday morning, James H. Thrall, MD, FACR, chair emeritus at Massachusetts General Hospital and Distinguished Taveras Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School, delivered the highly anticipated Moreton Lecture: “Imaging in the Era of Precision Medicine.”

Read more ...

In Case You Missed It

ACR 2015: Monday May 18

YPS

May 2015

Here's what happened on day 2 of the conference.

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Your New Favorite Hash Tag

Spotlight on Social Media

HashTagMain

With so many points of intersection between radiology and pathology, it was only a matter of time before physicians in the two specialties started tweeting at each other (and potentially grossing out non-physicians in the process). Here’s how it works.

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More than the Sum of Its Parts

Find out about the resources the JACR® has to offer.

MorethanSumBlog

May 2015

As the only peer-reviewed journal published by the College, the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR®) is unlike any tome among the hundreds of radiology journals currently in publication. Although it doesn’t cover strictly clinical cases, it contains a wealth of radiology information that many find important and influential.

Read more ...

9 Tips for Using Twitter and Engaging Attendees at Your Course

An ACR Ed Center faculty member shares her experience adding social media to her most recent course.

twitterblog

April 2015

I started using Twitter for professional interests in October 2014, and in a relatively short time I have become a huge fan and advocate of Twitter for radiologists. I have enjoyed many benefits that enhance my role as an academic neuroradiologist. Since some of my regular tweets include educational content, I had the idea of using Twitter at the ACR Education Center Neuroradiology course to supplement attendees’ learning and share the classroom experience with other radiologists on Twitter.

Read more ...

5 Radiology Stats That Might Surprise You

The latest tool from the Harvey Neiman Health Policy Institute is a must-see for radiologists.

N1

April 2015

The latest tool from the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute lets users create easy-to-read graphs and maps from a huge selection of radiology-focused data.

Read more ...

Let's Get Clinical

At ACR 2015, clinical education takes a leading role. Which sessions are on your agenda?

LetsGetClinical

At ACR 2015, clinical education will be woven throughout the meeting agenda. Whether you’re attending sessions from the Clinical Education Pathway or another area, clinical content will be an integral part of the meeting experience. As ACR 2015 nears, ACR members from across the specialty weigh in on their can’t-miss clinical aspects of the meeting.

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Clinical Education Pathway

ClinEduFORWEB

The clinical education programming offers the best leading-edge content to enhance the knowledge and clinical skills of radiologists. In engaging and interactive sessions, faculty will present information about pioneering technologies such as lung cancer screening, traumatic brain injury, and breast tomosynthesis.

Read more ...

Clinical Research Pathway

ClinicalRes

Prep for sessions in this pathway by browsing the following resources. Find out the results of cutting-edge research across subspecialties of medical imaging and radiation oncology, as well as how to properly write, edit, and review medical research.

Read more ...

Higher Learning

Lily M. Belfi, MD, tells the Bulletin about her experience as a Valerie P. Jackson Education Fellow. 

HigherLearning

 

The deadline for the 2017 VPJ fellowship is September 30th, 2016. Apply today!

This past fall, Lily M. Belfi, MD, assistant of professor radiology Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, visited the ACR Education Department as the Valerie P. Jackson (VPJ) Education Fellow.

Read more ...

Closed-Loop Obstruction Secondary to Adhesions

Submitted by John W. Fan, MD, and Bernard Chow, MD

Note: click on image above to enlarge.

The most popular Case in Point (CIP) submission of January 2013, as chosen by CIP users, was “Closed-Loop Obstruction Secondary to Adhesions.” January’s reader favorite explores the case of a 72-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain and vomiting.

Read more ...

Paving the Way

The American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP™) unveils its new radiation oncology course.

Note: click on image above to enlarge.

Beginning in February, residents will be able to attend the new radiation oncology offering at AIRP™, a four-day categorical course that will present a comprehensive view of imaging with emphasis on principles of radiologic-pathologic correlation.

Read more ...

Well Traveled

Radiologists look back on their experience with the ACR's Goldberg-Reeder Travel Grant.well traveled

You've just transferred to a new hospital, and things are looking rough. At best, you have an ultrasound machine at your disposal, but no sonographer. Patients come to you clutching their films, sometimes walking for miles to get to your door.

Read more ...

Survey Says

An ACR Task Force investigates radiology's role in medical education.survey says

The ACR Task Force on Medical Student Education in Radiology, in partnership with the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology, surveyed academic radiology department chairs and medical school deans in late 2012 to understand how medical imaging is currently taught and how physician education can adapt going forward.

Read more ...

Med School Reboot

Many medical schools take an antiquated approach to radiology education, but as imaging awareness increases, some schools are overhauling their programs.med school robot

Some things are meant to go together: peanut butter and jelly, peas and carrots, milk and cookies, and radiology and the continuum of patient care. While that last couplet may not be a household phrase, radiology is undoubtedly an integral part of medicine.

Read more ...

On the Grid

Check out some of the new and updated eLearning resources available from the College.on the grid

Earning Maintenance of Certification credits can be a daunting task for any physician, and radiologists are no exception. Whether you collect credits by flying in for a conference, attending webinars, or reviewing online cases, the process can be lengthy.

Read more ...

Building the Future of Radiology

The Radiology Leadership Institute® aims to broaden its reach and support radiologists throughout the specialty.Building the Future

Cynthia S. Sherry, MD, MMM, FACR, chief medical officer of the Radiology Leadership Institute® (RLI), explains where the RLI is headed and why leadership skills matter for radiology professionals.

Read more ...

Final Read

Q: What nonclincial subject do you wish had been included in your residency curriculum?final read

I have always loved learning new things. Since my residency and fellowship, I’ve studied languages and crafts, learned new sports, and gotten a couple of master’s degrees.

Read more ...

On the Same Page

What's new in the latest BI-RADS®?on the same page

The much anticipated fifth edition of the BI-RADS® Atlas is here at last. Wil Creech, leader of the BI-RADS team, explains how to make the best use of BI-RADS and why the atlas is so important.

Read more ...

Teaching the Teachers

A recent faculty development workshop reexamines the standards approach to CME.teaching the teachers

As technology moves forward at breakneck speed, why do teaching styles remain stuck in decades-old paradigms? With so many ways to take in information, many wonder what value is to be gained by scrolling through a stale slide presentation in front of a room of dozing attendees.

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What Makes the ACR Tick?

Ramesh S. Iyer, MD, tells the Bulletin about his experience as a Valerie P. Jackson Education Fellow.what makes acr tick art

During the fall of 2013, Ramesh S. Iyer, MD, assistant professor of radiology at the University of Washington and staff radiologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital, visited the ACR Education Department in Reston, Va., as the Valerie P. Jackson (VPJ) Education Fellow.

Read more ...

Mythbusters: Radiology Edition

There are a lot of common misconceptions surrounding the imaging specialty. How can radiologists debunk these myths for both patients and referring physicians?mythbusters

Every group of individuals has its own set of myths or stereotypes attached to it, and radiologists are no different. Here’s how to bust some common radiology misconceptions.

Read more ...

A Second Look

Adrenal insufficiency secondary to biopsy-proven histoplasmosis.A second look

The most popular Case in Point (CIP) submission of February 2013, as chosen by CIP users, was “Adrenal Insufficiency Secondary to Biopsy-Proven Histoplasmosis.” February’s reader favorite explores the case of a 38-year-old man who presented with nausea, vomiting, and weight loss.

Read more ...

Preparing for the Future

The RFS Journal Club brings together members-in-training to learn about radiology economics now and going forward.Prepare for future

I often hear from radiology residents that they’d like to be more involved in the College’s economics advocacy efforts and that they need to know more about the payment policy process.

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Radiation Oncology’s Rat Pack

Acclaimed physicians come together in an online ACR Journal Club.ratpack

Journal clubs thrive within the halls of medicine and have done so for centuries. The process of coming together with a critical, evidencebased eye to survey important literature is perfected in medical school and residency and is a familiar educational tool for most practicing physicians.

Read more ...

Lung Cancer Screening: The Time Has Come

The ACR responds to recent trial results and the USPSTF.iStock 000020134314 Large

Screening studies, such as mammography, prostate-specific antigen testing, and EKGs, are under attack. The opponents of these tests claim they are too costly and that there are too many misses and false positives.

Read more ...

PET Predictors

ACRIN and RTOG® release the results of the first multicenter trial to demonstrate the potential of PET imaging to predict long-term prognosis.PET Predictor

Recently reported clinical trial results suggest an important link between patient prognosis and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET).

Read more ...

Final Read

Q: What do you wish you'd known when you finished your residency?final read

Health care is a business, and I wish I had business training! During medical school, we focus on learning the fundamentals of medical science, including anatomy, physiology, and pathology.

Read more ...

Looking Back

The history of radiology is rich with important milestones and discoveries.looking back

Radiologists might know the day that Wilhelm Roentgen discovered the electrical discharge that would eventually become an x-ray. (It's November 8, 1895, in case you forgot.)

Read more ...

Class Act

Radiologists get a lesson in conveying empathy to patients.Class Act

Imagine your 6-month-old patient's parents are anxiously waiting in the next room. Ultrasound images confirm a tumor in their son's liver. Now you must convey the bad news.

Read more ...

Total Integration

At one medical school, radiologists are adding value throughout students' education and reinforcing the radiologist's central role in patient care.total integration

When Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine was established in 2008, the administration approached its curriculum in an unorthodox way.

Read more ...

A Second Look

Vasa Previa with Succenturiate Placenta. Submitted by Gavin B. Gore, MD, and Nadia J. Khati, MD.case in point

The most popular Case in Point (CIP) submission of December 2012, as chosen by CIP users, was "Vasa Previa with Succenturiate Placenta." The month's highest-rated case explores the evaluation of a 32-year-old woman who presented with second trimester bleeding.

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A Teachable Moment

A radiology resident visits the ACR Education Department to grow as an educator.a teachable moment

During the winter of 2013, Lu Anne V. Dinglasan, MD, MHS, vascular and interventional radiology fellow at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, visited the ACR Education Department in Reston, Va., as this year's Valerie P. Jackson (VPJ) Education Fellow.

Read more ...

Research Update

RTOG® reveals next steps to optimize radiation therapy.research update

Participants at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2013 Annual Meeting received updates on scientific questions investigated by RTOG®-sponsored research involving advances in the science underlying radiation oncology.

Read more ...

CIP Case of the Month

Traumatic Fractures. Submitted by Todd W. Cramer, MD, and Arun R. Krishnan, MD.CIP case of the month

November 2012's most popular Case in Point (CIP) submission, as chosen by CIP users, was "Traumatic Fractures." The case followed the management of a 56-year-old man who suffered a cervical spine injury after falling from a bicycle.

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A Closer Look at CPI

Subspecialty authorities contribute their expertise to one of the college's most popular educational programs.a closer look at CPI

For more than a decade, experts throughout the specialty have donated their time and expertise to ACR's Continuous Professional Improvement (CPI) program.

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Worthwhile Trials

Research participation invigorates radiation oncologists.worthwhile trials

Editor's Note: The April ACR Bulletin featured two radiologists whose practices participate in clinical trials. This month, two radiation oncologists share their motivation to pursue clinical research.

Read more ...

Final Read

Q: When did you know you wanted to be a radiologist?final read

While critically ill with bacterial meningitis at the age of four, I discovered a new world.

Read more ...

CIP Case of the Month

Intussusception. Submitted by Zachary L. Bercu, MD, Semo Siljkovic, RDMS, and Neil A. Lester, MD.cip

October 2012's most popular Case in Point (CIP) submission, as chosen by CIP users, was Intussusception." The winning case followed the management of a 22-month-old boy who presented with abdominal pain.

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Community-Based Studies Lead to Success

Private practices take part in clinical trials to advance the field and enhance patient care.community based studies

Two community-based radiologists whose private practices maintain vibrant research departments make the case that devoting the time and resources in the beginning pays off in the end. They enthusiastically convey the benefits of radiology practice participation in clinical trials — particularly those sponsored by ACRIN® — and discuss the steps their practices took to establish clinical programs.

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Clinical Confirmation

ACRIN® trial results identify weakness of whole-body MRI for the staging of common pediatric cancers.clinical confirmation

Over the last 40 years, survival rates for children with cancer have increased dramatically in the United States. In the mid-1970s, the combined five-year survival rate for all childhood cancers was less than 60 percent.

Read more ...

CIP Case of the Month

Coalescent Mastoiditis. Submitted by Harold R. Levine, MD, Kelli Y. Ha, MD, Michael J. Opatowsky, MD, MBA, and Brian O'Rourke, MD.case in point

In September 2012, ACR selected "Coalescent Mastoiditis" as the best Case in Point (CIP) submission of the month. CIP is ACR's most popular e-learning activity, offering members the opportunity to earn free CME credit for the completion of each daily case.

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High-Class Learning

Find out what new and improved education resources are available from the College.high class learning

It's no secret that physicians must earn a large number of CME credits each year as well as a variety of self-assessment module (SAM) credits. And for radiologists, who are among those who must earn the most of these credits, learning (and earning) opportunities come from myriad sources ranging from fly-to and sit-down conferences and lectures to on-demand webinars, workbooks, and websites.

Read more ...

ACRIN and RTOG Research in the Spotlight

Exciting new findings lead to advances in patient care.ACRIN and RTOG research

The annual meetings of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and RSNA provide an excellent venue to showcase RTOG® and ACRIN® research.

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A Shared Legacy

The ACR Archives yield an important piece of history.a shared legacy

It was the summer of 1931 in Paris. As the story goes, Benjamin Orndoff, MD, ACR executive secretary, scanned the crowd, looking for the guest of honor at the ACR Gold Medal ceremony. The same question was on everyone's minds.

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CIP Case of the Month

Hypothalamic Hamartoma. Submitted by Scott E. Forseen, MD, and Kevin F. Johnson, MDcase in point

Case in Point (CIP) is an online learning activity that offers free CME credit for all ACR members. A new case is published each day, and topics cover a variety of subspecialty areas and include uncommon conditions as well as more familiar presentations.

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Military Might

Biomarkers play a significant role in screening for early lung cancer.military might

Military personnel, both active and veteran, have a high risk of lung cancer. To improve the rate of early detection of the disease, the Detection of Early Lung Cancer Among Military Personnel (DECAMP) Consortium has begun its first research protocol, with both the Boston University School of Medicine and ACRIN® playing key project roles.

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Yearn to Learn

What can ACR membership do for your continuing medical education?yearn to learn

Approximately a year and a half ago, the ACR Commission on Education (COE) underwent a major restructuring to more efficiently meet the educational needs of ACR members. The COE is composed of eight members, who oversee 148 physician volunteers serving on 18 committees and subcommittees.

Read more ...

A True Picture of Radiology

The College's newest institute provides research on the effects of health policy and illustrates the true value of radiology.a true picture

How do you define imaging? For some, it is the means to a successful livelihood for themselves and their staff; for others, it's an indispensable tool used to improve a patient's quality of life.

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Come Together

ACR-managed societies united radiologists and strengthen the specialty.come together

No matter your subspecialty, you'll likely find a related society.

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In the Game

As sports concussions gain more attention, radiologists dive in to help prevent further injuries.in the game

Anyone who's been to a football game knows the sound of helmet meeting helmet, an icy and distinct "crack." Some spectators feel energized by the sport's telltale soundtrack as they anticipate mind-blowing plays and complex strategies.

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Measure for Measure

Trial signal advances in breast MRI for locally advanced breast cancer and DCIS.measure for mesaure

Results of the ACRIN® 6657 trial, Contrast-Enhanced Breast MRI for Evaluation of Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Treatment for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer, reported in the June 2012 issue of Radiology, reveal that changes in tumor volume determined by MRI are a better predictor of pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy than a clinical exam.1

Read more ...

Back to Basics in Pediatric Imaging

New Image Gently® initiative educates the imaging community and the public on opportunities to optimize radiation dose in digital radiography.back to basics

Many things in life require balance: work and play, study and application, or even too much or too little of just about anything.

Read more ...

CIP Case of the Month

Chronic Pulmonary Embolism by Ana Claudia Ferreira Rosa, MD.CIP case of month

Since its introduction in 2005, the ACR Case in Point (CIP) daily case challenge has been embraced by members and participating radiologists. Recently, CIP Editor-in-Chief Kitt Shaffer, MD, PhD, FACR, decided to highlight a "Case of the Month," which is chosen based on a survey of CIP readers, who give each case an overall rating.

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More Than CPI

Continuous Professional Improvement program takes on modality-specific CME.more than cpi

Radiologists who want to earn CME or SAM credits often seek materials or events that not only fulfill their practice requirements for the year but also keep them up-to-date within their specialties. This can be difficult, particularly with recent, more rigorous accreditation requirements from states, hospitals, and accrediting bodies.

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Final Read

Q: What is your favorite aspect of residency?final read

Radiology residency has been the most exciting and inspiring time of my life.

Read more ...

Investigating the Incidentals

ACRIN study assesses the extracolonic findings of the National CT Colonography Trial.investigating incidentals

Despite the fact that colorectal cancer (CRC) is largely preventable through routine screening, approximately one-third of eligible adults age 50 and older do not undergo screening.

Read more ...

Sowing Seeds of Change

The RLI launch event honors leaders and discusses leadership fundamentals.sowing seeds

Leaders and aspiring leaders in radiology who attended the Radiology Leadership Institute's (RLI) launch event in July were awed not only by the picturesque Northwestern University Campus in Evanston, Ill., but also by the high caliber of speakers and instructors, the networking opportunities, and the compelling content.

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Chance Encounter

The rise in the number of incidental findings brings ethical and medical dilemmas to the forefront.chance encounter

The increase in CT scans and other medical imaging in recent years has been accompanied by an increase in the number of incidental findings, both in clinical medicine and in research. In many cases, incidental findings can cause ethical and clinical dilemmas for radiologists.

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Back to School

ACR has a lot to offer, whether you're looking to keep your skills current or pursue something new.back to school

It's that time of year. The days are cooling off and the leaves are getting ready to change color and fall. Meanwhile, kids and parents are getting ready for a new school year. Nervous stomachs and first-day jitters abound.

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RTOG® Highlights Biomarker-Driven Science

Radiation oncology studies continue to move the science forward.RTOG highlights

Eight RTOG®-sponsored studies were recently recognized at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2012 Annual Meeting as significant to the field of radiation oncology.

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Commemorating 100 Years

Texas Radiological Society leaders reflect on their centennial meeting and overall success.commemorating 100 years

The chapter task force overseeing the Texas Radiological Society (TRS) 2013 centennial meeting includes 13 subcommittees and close to 40 TRS members, who will ensure every detail — from the hotel accommodations to a one-of-a-kind educational programming — runs smoothly. This group will make next year's celebration of 100 years, held on April 5-7, 2013, in Houston, one to remember.

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The New ACR.orgnew acr

The new ACR.org website is designed to meet individual members' interests. Widgets on the right side of the home page will provide links to your chapter, any committees or commissions on which you're a member, and your member profile.

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Driven

Radiology residents push to complete their residency on a high note and begin building their careers.driven

What makes one person spend four hours studying for a test when another only studies for 30 minutes? Perhaps it's the desire to out-perform peers or a need to truly master the material.

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Mirror Mirror

New board exam format more closely represents the practice of radiology.mirror mirror

Education has come a long way since radiology boards were established in 1934 with solely oral components.

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Final Read

Q: Tell us about an educational opportunity you've pursued outside the classroom.final read

I am scheduled to complete a medical journalism elective for ABC News in New York City in October 2012.

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Hitting the Target

Proton beam therapy eradicates cancer cells with less radiation spill-off. But do its benefits outweigh the cost?hitting the dartboard

The definition and properties of protons are taught in every basic physics and chemistry class. Yet, what most students never learn is that these positively charged subatomic particles are now being used by radiation oncologists to eradicate cancerous cells.

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Close to the Heart

CCTA used to rule out acute coronary syndrome in the ED.close to the heart

In the past, patients who were at risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) faced a lengthy stay at the hospital.

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Expanding Outlooks

Radiology Leadership Institute helps radiologists move ahead.expanding outlooks

Next month, the ACR Radiology Leadership Institute (RLI) will formally begin its curriculum to help radiologists reach their leadership potential.

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RTOG® Takes on Head and Neck Cancer

Researchers investigate how radiation therapy affects human papillomavirus-related cancer.RTOG Head and NEck

The discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated head and neck cancer has prompted researchers to explore treatment options specific to a patient's HPV status. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group® (RTOG®) is conducting two trials based on this new etiology and prognostic factor.

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Going the Distance

ACR's commitment to the Haitian radiology community continues with innovative education programs.going the distance

By now, you're probably familiar with the ACR's efforts to help rebuild radiology services in Haiti after a devastating earthquake occurred in January 2010.

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Treating Lung Cancer With Adaptive Radiotherapy

Trial explores adaptive radiotherapy's effect on locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.treating lung cancer

The recently launched RTOG 1106/ACRIN 6697 clinical trial is evaluating if, during the course of radiotherapy (RT) treatment, information gained from an FDG-PET/CT scan can facilitate individualized adaptive therapy in patients with inoperable stage-III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

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Complicated Comparisons

Comparative effectiveness research shifts into high gear, but can radiology find its place?complicated comparisons

Does your patient have a life worth living? That's one of the many questions that comparative effectiveness research (CER) endeavors to answer, according to Constantine Gatsonis, Ph.D., professor of Biostatistics and Applied Mathematics at Brown University in Providence, R.I.

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Following New Wisdom

Experienced researchers sign on to guide ACRIN® and RTOG® cancer trials.following wisdom

The importance of outstanding scientific leadership in guiding clinical research that translates into clinical benefits for patients with cancer cannot be overstated. Two leaders, Daniel P. Barboriak, M.D., and Quynh-Thu Le, M.D., have recently begun guiding head, neck, and neurological trials at ACRIN® and RTOG®.

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The Ripple Effect

ACR Clinical Research Center trials create waves of change in patient care.the ripple effect

For more than 40 years, the ACR has supported clinical research endeavors crucial to shaping medical imaging and radiation oncology.

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Genetic Expressions

Genomics research may transform personalized medicine. How can radiologists help?genetic expressions

Compiling samples of thousands of genomes from cancer patients may sound like a daunting task, but that's exactly what The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has been doing.

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Improving Outcomes With MRI/MRS

Research evaluates the roles of MRI and MRS in brain tumor therapy.improving MRI

Research conducted collaboratively by ACRIN® and RTOG® to assess the potential role of perfusion MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) as early indicators of response to antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) holds promise for improving historically poor clinical outcomes in patients with this malignant brain tumor.

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Final Read

Q: Tell us about your most interesting research.final read

I was recruited to help train CT technologists at Fort Defiance Indian Hospital and Tuba City Regional Health Care Corp., two rural hospitals in Arizona, to perform remote CT colonography (CTC) for colorectal carcinoma screening.

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Putting In-Training Exams to the Test

For years, residents have taken either the DXIT™ or TXIT™ exam. Soon one of them will be going digital.in training tests

The past few years have been a period of extraordinary change for radiology exams. In 2008, the ABR announced that it would be altering the board exams given to residents beginning in the fall of 2013.

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Invested in Improvement

What motivates ACR clinical research trial volunteers and leaders?invested in improvement

Members of the radiation oncology and radiology communities volunteer countless hours to carry out trials supported by ACR's Clinical Research Center.

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Head of the Class

Radiology is constantly changing, making education a must regardless of your career stage.head of the class

Radiologists today face mounting pressures, including increased self-referrals, reimbursement contingencies, and patients' fears about radiation safety. As a result, imagers undoubtedly realize that their highly competitive specialty is rapidly changing and requires advanced skills and training.

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Tapping Into Rich Resources

JACR launches new website, continues to provide invaluable tools and content.tapping into rich resources

Why should you take the time to read the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR) every month? What makes it so special? The journal is an informative, trustworthy resource for radiologists to use in daily practice.

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The Art of the Question

New reforms create demand for skilled item writers.the art of the question

Well-prepared residents fly through them in less than a minute. They read the question, consider the options, choose an answer, and move on.

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Innovation in Imaging Research and Tools

ACRIN® presents research results and unveils image-markup tool at RSNA annual conference.innovation in imaging

New and emerging clinical research findings from ACRIN® were well represented among the 2,600 scientific paper and poster presentations at RSNA's 96th Scientific Assembly and Annual meeting.

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