Final Read

Lynn S. Broderick, MD, FACR

finalread

March 2015

Q:What is one of your most memorable experiences with a patient?

Years ago, I performed a venogram on a middle-aged woman.

When I asked her about the onset of her symptoms, she told me that she started to experience leg pain during her daughter's funeral and that she had lost her husband the month before. I was young at the time and not sure how to respond. I performed the test and processed the films. She had deep vein thrombosis, so I returned to the room to tell her the diagnosis and to let her know that

I would contact her primary care doctor. Then I said to her, "I am sorry to hear about your loss. No one ever expects to bury their child and to lose their husband too. That is more than one person can bear. I think that your body is trying to tell you that you need to take time to heal." I then left to call her doctor.

When I returned with her doctor's instructions, she took my hand and asked my name. Then she thanked me. She did not tell me what she thought of our encounter,

We are trained as radiologists to make the diagnosis. But if we are open to other possibilities, we can participate in the healing of our patients as well.

-Lynn S. Broderick, MD, FACR

but I sensed that it was meaningful to her that someone else had acknowledged what she already knew. We are trained as radiologists to make the diagnosis. But if we are open to other possibilities, we can participate in the healing of our patients as well.


finalreadprofileLynn S. Broderick, MD, FACR, Professor, Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Meriter Hospital

Share this content

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn