Final Read

Raymond E. Bozman, MD, FACR
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It was the summer of 1978 and the rising second-year medical student was beginning an elective rotation in radiology at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.

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Matthew M. Miller, MD
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Q: When did you know you wanted to be a radiologist?

Well, I would love to say there was a great thunderclap moment — an instant when even disinterested passersby would have to admit my unmistakable radiologist identity burst forth for the first time. But my path, it turns out, was a bit more gradual than that.

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Sara H. Kim, MDfinal read

Q: How do you create the ideal patient experience in your practice?

Every day, as a radiation oncologist, I witness the stress patients living with a cancer diagnosis go through.

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Daniel Ortiz, MDfinal read

Q: When and why did you first join the ACR?

As a first year radiology resident, I was encouraged by my more senior co-residents to join several of the radiology organizations, including the ACR, as “the thing to do.” My first direct exposure came at the state level with the annual Virginia Chapter meeting.

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Van A. Montgomery, MD Memphis Radiological

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Q: What is one thing that would make your life as a radiologist better?

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Mohammad Naeem, MD
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Q: What is it like being a military radiologist?

Military radiologists are not only physicians but also military officers and leaders, assuming administrative and supervisory responsibilities very early in their careers.

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Pooja R. Voria, MD, MBA

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Q: What would you say to a young physician considering radiology?

To be honest, I went into medical school thinking that I would be a cardiothoracic surgeon. I wasn't even considering radiology.

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Final Read

Scott Schultz, MD, FACR

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Q: What changes do you see for the field of radiology in the next decade?

As an interventional radiologist, I have seen many amazing changes in our field. And I foresee ongoing dynamic changes in the next decade.

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Final Read

Join Y. Luh, MD

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Q: How do you include patients in their health care decision-making?

As a radiation oncologist, I have direct face-to-face interaction with patients throughout the care process, from the initial consultation to long-term follow up. These interactions ensure I cultivate lasting relationships with cancer survivors.

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final read july 16

Q: How does participating in outside activities benefit you as a physician?

I always encourage medical students to nurture a passion outside of medicine, be it playing a musical instrument or writing poetry.

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Courtney Tomblinson,MD

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Q: Why did you choose the imaging specialty?

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Ainsley V.MacLean, MD

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Ainsley V. MacLean, MD, regional medical director for imaging services at MAPMG and president of the District of Columbia Metropolitan Radiological Society (DCMRS) 2016–2017 (center) poses with Shashi Ranganath, MD, assistant regional medical director for imaging services at MAPMG (left), and Andrea Giacometti, MD, FACR, diagnostic radiologist at MAPMG and councilor and past president of DCMRS.

Q: What advice do you have for future women leaders in radiology?

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Shaun J. Gonda, MD

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Q: How do you as a radiologist help support the specialty?

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Travis S. Graham, MD

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January 2016

Q: How do you avoid burnout?

You all know the spiel about strategies to avoid burnout.

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Final Read

Michael J. Kasotakis, MD

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November 2015 

Q:What does the radiologist of the future look like?

In the past, a radiologist’s value may have hinged on one or two attributes.

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Final Read

Mark H. LeQuire, MD, FACR

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September 2015

Q: Tell us about a colleague who inspired you. 

Mentors. What an essential ingredient to success in one’s professional career. I have been blessed to have one at every stage of my life. All my mentors have had a part in shaping me, but one individual in particular inspired me to become the radiologist that I am.

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Final Read

Michael T. Otte, MD

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August 2015

Q: How can you add value to health care through advocacy?

I have little experience or ambition politically but began working in the Colorado Radiologic Society. I received ACR emails and bulletins describing urgent legislation that could be detrimental to our livelihoods. I wasn’t sure how to get involved in influencing the health care system because I did not understand advocacy.

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Final Read

Evelyn Y. Anthony, MD

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July 2015

Q: How do you make interacting with patients a priority?

 As a Pediatric radiologist, I probably have more opportunities to connect with patients than many radiologists. One of my most memorable experiences was about two years ago.

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Final Read

Ronald J. Boucher, MD

 

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May 2015

Q: How does your practice demonstrate the principles of Imaging 3.0™?

As a battlefield radiologist in Kandahar, Afghanistan, I was privileged to serve as chief of radiology on a multinational and multidisciplinary team. Serving during a war reinforced to me how critical Imaging 3.0 principles are to the success of health care. Our radiologists inserted themselves at the beginning of the care process for trauma patients, determining whether the patient needed to go directly to the operating room or get further CT evaluations.

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Final Read

David T. Boyd, MD, MBA

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April 2015

Q: How can state chapters work together with the ACR?

Engaging residents and fellows in radiology leadership is an important goal for the Washington, D.C., chapter

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Final Read

Lynn S. Broderick, MD, FACR

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March 2015

Q:What is one of your most memorable experiences with a patient?

Years ago, I performed a venogram on a middle-aged woman.

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Final Read

Taj Kattapuram, MD

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February 2015

Q: How has social media helped your practice?

 Social media is a wonderful educational and interactive tool for the department of radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital.

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Final Read

Madelene C. Lewis, MD

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January 2015

Q: Why is it valuable to network with other radiologists?

Networking provides radiologists with an opportunity to enhance both professional development and personal performance.

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Q: Why is it valuable to attend radiology conferences?

Kathleen A. Ryan, MD, Final Read, ACR Bulletin

Having practiced for more than 20 years in Montana, I always look forward to meetings with fellow mammography colleagues around the country.

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Q: What is the one thing you wish your patients knew?

Final Read: Demetrius K. Morros, MD, FACR

I wish they knew that, as radiologists, most of what we see we recognize and know well, but we don’t always have the right answer. That’s just the nature of the beast.

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Final Read

Seth M. Hardy, MD

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Q: What does being an ACR member mean to you?

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Q:Why is it important to participate in your state chapter?

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Curiosity led me to attend my first Missouri Radiological Society (MORADS) meeting. I felt like a confused child looking into a bowl of alphabet soup — unintelligible acronyms, like HIPAA and MU, constantly floated by in discussions.

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Final Read

Patricia A. Helke, MD, MBA
Jan14 final read

Q: How do you add value to your interactions with referring physicians?

In the age of the commoditization of radiology, it is critical to add value to our practice interactions with referring physicians. To this end, our practice tries to make our service to our colleagues personalized.

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Final Read

Andrew L. Rivard, MD

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Q: How do you place yourself at the center of patient care?

Although it is impossible for me to meet every patient, I am able to interact with patients undergoing certain procedures.

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Final Read

Bryan M. Rabatic, MD, PhD
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Q: What would you say to a young physician considering radiation oncology?

I am often asked, "How did you choose your specialty?" Almost immediately, that question is followed by, "What advice do you have for someone considering radiation oncology?"

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Q: Value is a hot topic in radiology right now. What does the term mean to you?final read

The value a radiologist adds to the medical team became apparent to me early in my medical school days.

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Final Read

Q: Describe a signficiant interaction you had with a patient.final read main article

When generating diagnostic imaging interpretations, radiologists may use medical nomenclature that can confuse both referring physicians and patients. A simple, quick conversation goes a long way to resolve these misunderstandings.

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Q: What nonclincial subject do you wish had been included in your residency curriculum?final read

I have always loved learning new things. Since my residency and fellowship, I’ve studied languages and crafts, learned new sports, and gotten a couple of master’s degrees.

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Q: What is the best advice you would give to young radiologists just starting out?final read

Residency is a wonderful place; you may make lifelong friends while learning the fundamentals of a skillset that will support you and your family for decades.

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Q: Tell us about an unexpected experience with an associate.final read

She was 80, post lumpectomy, referred for radiotherapy. She was among a wave of patients avoiding mastectomy in the wake of the NSABP B-06 report providing lumpectomy and whole-breast radiotherapy equal to masectomy.

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Q: What can radiologists do to become visible members of the care team?final read

I look forward to the day when our patients routinely view their radiologist in the same way they see their internist or cardiologist.

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How do you increase public awareness and understanding of radiology?final read main

I believe radiology is the single most misunderstood specialty both within medicine and among the general public. How do we change this?

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How do you stay up to date with new developments in radiology?final read

It is often difficult to stay current given the time constraints that come with a resident's lifestyle. Overnight call, conference preparation, and textbook reading do not allow for much free time to catch up on the latest medical news.

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Q: Tell us about a time you effectively overcame an ethical dilemma as a radiologist.final read

Many times on overnight call, usually while searching for the appendix or trying to find a transition point, I've bemoaned my department's low-dose pediatric CT protocols, which can turn bowel loops into one big jumbled mess.

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Q: Tell us about a colleague who has inspired you.final read

Family and teachers as well as my patients have all inspired and encouraged this country boy to hoe a very long row. However, Michael P. McNamara, MD, stands taller than all the rest.

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Q: When did you know you wanted to be a radiologist?final read

While critically ill with bacterial meningitis at the age of four, I discovered a new world.

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Final Read

Q: How do you make interacting with patients a priority?final read

When most physicians applied to medical school, they stated during their interviews that they wanted to go into medicine to help patients.

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Q: What advances in the field of radiology do you find most exciting?final read

In 1983, while I was in the U.S. Navy, I first became aware of teleradiology.

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Q: How do you avoid getting burned out?final read

I wish I could say that I've never felt overwhelmed at my job, but I suspect few of us can. I think burnout happens when people start feeling overwhelmed all the time and it starts to affect them negatively.

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What do you do to avoid health problems associated with sitting for hours each day?final read

You don't need tables and facts to know that as you age, you tend to become less active. Careers, marriages, children, and community service can all take their toll, and eventually something has to go.

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Q: What was your most memorable AMCLC experience?final read

While serving as president of the Colorado Radiological Society, I attended my first AMCLC on September 11, 2001, in San Francisco. Feeling horrified in the wake of the terrorist attacks, like everyone else that day, the attendees didn't know what to do.

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Q: What do you wish you'd known when you finished your residency?final read

Health care is a business, and I wish I had business training! During medical school, we focus on learning the fundamentals of medical science, including anatomy, physiology, and pathology.

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Q: How do you minimize (or deal with) distractions throughout the day?final read

First, I try to be organized. I have a comfortable workspace with minimal clutter.

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Q: How do you balance work and home life?final read

My wife of 21 years, Leisa, is an anesthesiologist. We both completed medical school and residency at the University of Alabama School of Medicine in Birmingham.

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Q: Tell us about a recent change implemented at your practice.final read

Since we are a very large practice, even small changes in billing or reimbursement can have a major effect on us. To improve our billing and reimbursement processes, we've made three specific changes.

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Q: Tell us about a time you advocated for the specialty.final read

Recently, I had the opportunity to convey — in person — this important message to Representative Gregg Harper (R-Miss.): Radiology is significantly improving our patients' lives.

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Q: How has volunteering with the ACR furthered your personal goals?final read

As a resident, I was constantly told by senior radiologists that the "golden age" of radiology had ended, and we must adapt to meet the changing needs of American health care.

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Q: Tell us about a time you effectively handled a crisis.final read

The practice of clinical medicine is fraught with unforeseen daily crises, which may result in patient harm if left unattended.

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Q: Tell us about an educational opportunity you've pursued outside the classroom.final read

I am scheduled to complete a medical journalism elective for ABC News in New York City in October 2012.

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Q: What is your favorite aspect of the AMCLC?final read

I truly enjoy all of the AMCLC, but the Economics Forum is my favorite portion because it is always directly useful to my practice.

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Q: What is your favorite aspect of residency?final read

Radiology residency has been the most exciting and inspiring time of my life.

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Q: How do you increase public awareness of radiology?final read

When I chose to pursue radiology, my mentors tried to dissuade me, warning I would sit in a dark room and never see patients.

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Q: How did you choose your subspecialty?final read

When I was a radiology resident, I have to admit that I was mystified by nuclear medicine. Residents sometimes jokingly called the field "unclear medicine."

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Q: How has state chapter membership benefited you?final read

Each month during my second year of residency in Minnesota, faculty and residents would pile into cars for the hour-long ride to the state chapter meeting.

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Q: Tell us about your international rotation experience.final read

During my medical school and internship years at Brown University, I collaborated with my mentor Anne S. DeGroot, M.D., from the Global Alliance to Vaccinate Against AIDS, to identify, raise funds for, and train medical professionals to use an ultrasound machine for a community-based clinic in Sikoro, a slum of Bamako, Mali.

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Q: Tell us about your most interesting research.final read

I was recruited to help train CT technologists at Fort Defiance Indian Hospital and Tuba City Regional Health Care Corp., two rural hospitals in Arizona, to perform remote CT colonography (CTC) for colorectal carcinoma screening.

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Final Read

How has social media influenced you as a radiologist?final read

Given that there are relatively few women in radiology and particularly interventional radiology, social media platforms allow me to connect with other women in our field more easily than in my day-to-day practice.

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Final Read

What is one of your most memorable experiences with a patient?

FinalRead OctoberPictured from left to right are Jane Karimova, MD, Vandana Dialani, MD, Priscilla J. Slanetz, MD, MPH, Tejas S. Mehta, MD, MPH,
Sean Raj, MD, Rashmi Mehta, MD, Nancy Resteghini, MD, Valerie Fein-Zachary, MD, and Jordana Phillips, MD.

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