September Case of the Month

Access case here.

Authors: Jessica Lien, BS, MS-IV, Medical Student, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wis.; Gregory Avey, MD , Professor of Ophthalmology, Oculofacial Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wis.; Mark Lucarelli, MD, FACS, Professor of Ophthalmology, Oculofacial Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wis.

Why did you select this case for submission?

This case was recommended to me by my attending, Dr. Lucarelli, and I thought the topic was very interesting and informative.

What should readers learn from this case?

The goal of the case is to remind the reader that an orbital pseudotumor is a diagnosis of exclusion. Other causes of orbital inflammation need to be considered to ensure the appropriate treatment.

What did you learn from working on the case?

I didn’t know much about the diagnosis of orbital pseudotumors and the other causes of orbital inflammation. I learned a lot from researching the various diagnoses to write the case.

How did guidance from senior staff at your institution impact your learning and case development?

I couldn’t have written the case without the knowledge and teaching of Drs. Lucarelli and Avey. They spent the time with me to help me better understand the different diagnoses and imaging modalities.

Why did you choose Case in Point for submission of your case?

We chose Case in Point because we liked the format and online learning portion of the cases.

What is the appeal of online learning tools such as Case in Point as opposed to print learning venues?

With everything moving online, it seemed like a great place for our case. The question format and immediate feedback allows for critical thinking and makes it more likely that people will remember what they learned in the case.

Are you a regular reader of Case in Point? What are your favorite types of cases?

Yes, and as a regular reader my favorite types of cases are the rare but important ones. CIP offers outstanding exposure to images of unusual cases encountered at various institutions. I also like the collection of uncommon presentations of common entities.

 

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